Archive for the Flip Flops Category

Same As Bush On The Fundamentals

Posted in Accountability, Flip Flops, Outright Lies, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , , on October 26, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

Today on Meet The Press:

He touts his immigration reform as going against his own party.  The problem is that he actually folded to his own party even saying that he would vote against his own immigration bill.

Note: John McCain often uses the McCain / Kennedy Comprehensive Immigration Bill as an example of him reaching across the isle even though he does not support it.  This bill also mirrored the immigration plan laid out by no other then George W. Bush.  McCain only changed his position after running for president.

Update: TJR shows just how much McCain’s words today don’t add up:

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McCain Was For Obama’s “Socialist” Tax Plan Before He Was Against It

Posted in Flip Flops, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , , , on October 22, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

I guess this would also make him a “Socialist?”

So what has changed?  You only need to look at who is now running John McCain’s campaign.  He seems to have sold out on every key position he has ever taken.

Update:

I just came across this video of the John McCain I supported in 2000.  

McCain All Over The Place on The Economy

Posted in Flip Flops, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , , on September 19, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

John McCain decided to throw out his now famous Herbert Hoover / George Bush line about the fundamentals of our economy being strong on the very day we came to realize just how bad things have gotten.  

McCain has since been in damage control mode now saying that he meant the fundamentals of the American worker are strong.  This however has not been his message the past sixteen plus times he made the comment.  I went and threw together all of the different times I could find with a quick search of youtube and pared it up with some footage from the Hoover / Roosevelt race.  There are some interesting similarities:

Here is a compilation from TPM of John McCain’s new found populist definition of his statement:

John McCain has also began flip flopping on his well documented stance favoring deregulation.  In March McCain gave a speech where he said:

 “Our financial market approach should include encouraging increased capital in financial institutions by removing regulatory, accounting and tax impediments to raising capital.”

The New York Times reports that:

In early 1995, after Republicans had taken control of Congress, Mr. McCain promoted a moratorium on federal regulations of all kinds. He was quoted as saying that excessive regulations were “destroying the American family, the American dream” and voters “want these regulations stopped.”

In the past couple days John McCain has been saying he is for more regulation.  Think Progress points out that he doesn’t seem quite clear on what his position is:

– Deregulation: McCain issued a statement Monday morning saying that “we cannot tolerate a system that handicaps our markets and our banks.”

– Both: On CNBC’s Squawk Box, McCain said, “We don’t want to burden average citizens with over-regulation and government bureaucracy…And I’m proud to be a Teddy Roosevelt Republican, who said, ‘unfettered capitalism leads to corruption,’ and we’ve got to fix this.”

– Regulation: McCain’s campaign then put out an ad calling for “tougher rules on Wall Street.”

– Deregulation: This morning, on NBC’s Today Show, McCain said, “Of course, I don’t like excessive and unnecessary government regulation.” (see below)

– Regulation: Then, on CBS’s The Early Show, McCain said, “Do I believe in excess government regulation? Yes.” (see below)

McCain On Voting Against Minimum Wage 19 Times

Posted in Flip Flops, Outright Lies, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , on August 31, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

From Think Progress 8/31/08:

After Voting Against Them 19 Times, McCain Claims He Supports Minimum Wage Increases

Today on Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace asked Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) why he has voted 17 times against raising the federal minimum wage. (Wallace later corrected himself and pointed out it was 19 times, to which McCain dismissively replied, “Well, or 29 or 49, whatever it is.”) McCain initially attempted to wriggle out of answering by talking about tax cuts.

But when pressed again by Wallace, McCain claimed that he opposed the increases only because they were attached to unrelated spending bills:

McCAIN: I’m for the minimum wage increases when they are not attached to other big-spending pork barrel. The practice in Washington is attach a good thing to a bad thing. And that way, then you have to vote yes or no. […]

When I’m president, I’m going to veto every bill that doesn’t have straight up or down votes on the issues that are important to the American people. … The fact is that I am for a living wage for all Americans.

Watch it:

Ironically, one of the only times McCain actually did support a minimum wage increase was when it was tied to a war funding bill. But on at least 15 occasions, McCain has opposed minimum wage increases that were stand-alone amendments or bills. On April 7, 2000, he even voted against a non-binding “sense of the Senate” resolution “concerning an increase in the Federal minimum wage.”

McCain’s assertion that he supports a “living wage” for all Americans is even more questionable, considering his 19 votes against the minimum wage. After all, a living wage is usually even higher than the minimum wage.

John McCain Criticizes Same Earmark That He Voted For

Posted in Character, Flip Flops, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , , on August 19, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

 

Apparently John McCain voted for the bill providing the money to do the research on bears in Montana that he has been criticizing on the campaign trail.

FactCheck.org Annenberg Political Fact Check

Paternity Tests for Bears
Good laugh lines, maybe, but the United States Geological Service’s Northern Divide Grizzly Bear Project didn’t study DNA for paternity tests or forensics. Rather, it explored a means of estimating Montana’s grizzly bear population by analyzing bear fur snagged on barbed wire. The project was funded partly by federal appropriations – about $1 million per year in add-ons to USGS in 2003 through 2005, $400,000 in 2006 and $300,000 in 2007, plus a $1.1 million earmark through the Forest Service in 2004, according to the study’s principal researcher, Katherine C. Kendall. Part of that funding was doled out as part of the omnibus appropriations bill McCain discussed in February 2003.     

Despite the fun McCain had ridiculing the bear project on the Senate floor, he didn’t actually try to remove it from the bill. He did introduce several amendments, including three to reduce funding for projects he considered wasteful or harmful, but none removing the grizzly bear project appropriations. And despite his criticisms, he voted in favor of the final bill.

Factcheck.org also goes also points out John McCains other misleading statements relating to pork:
http://www.factcheck.org/outrageous_exaggerations.html

 

And of course there was the “Pant’s on Fire” line :

Pants on fire!

McCain says the price of a gas tax “holiday” would be about the same as “a Bridge to Nowhere (or) another pork barrel project.”

John McCain on Thursday, April 24th, 2008 in an interview on the Fox News Channel. >>Details

(http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/458/)

John McCain: Proud to Flip Flop on Running a Positive Campaign

Posted in Character, Flip Flops, Watch for Yourself with tags , , , , on August 3, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

Chalk another flip flop up to John McCain.  After pledging not to run a negative campaign, his camp spent the last week putting out some of the most ridiculous and petty ads I have ever seen.  When questioned about the negative ads McCain responded that he was “proud” of them.

After running just a few ads introducing himself, John McCain’s campaign has turned increasingly negative.  Huffington Post blogger Sam Stein laid out the following time line showing the course it has taken:

On July 7, McCain’s campaign put out the spot “Love” a one-minute biographical advertisement that focused almost solely on the Senator. The ad began with the social tensions of the 60s and moved from there into McCain’s history from Vietnam onward. The only dig at Obama was implicit. “John McCain doesn’t tell us what we… HOPE… to hear. Beautiful words cannot make our lives better…”

On July 10, McCain put out the ad “God’s Children,” a minute-long spot meant to appeal to Latino voters. None of the footage includes Obama. It is, rather, mostly a clip from a Republican primary debate in which the Arizona Republican discussed the military sacrifices made by Hispanic Americans.

On July 17, 2008, the McCain campaign put out a nearly eight-minute long “Obama documentary.” An effective, albeit lengthy, spot, it is devoted in its entirety to painting the Democratic nominee as a serial flip-flopper on the war.

On July 18, the campaign put out “Troop Funding” to preempt Obama’s trip to the Middle East and Europe. It was harshly negative, accusing Obama of changing positions for political purposes and misleadingly saying that he voted against troop funding (when McCain had, by that technical definition, done the same). The last ten seconds of the 30-second-spot were devoted to McCain, however, declaring that “he has always supported our troops. ”

On July 21, McCain released the “Pump” ad, which blames Obama for the high price of gasoline. The spot, which begins with the shot of a pump and people chanting Obama’s name, crests with the question: “Who can you thank for rising prices at the pump?” A picture of the Illinois Democrat is plastered on the screen. The last 12-seconds of the thirty-second spot are devoted to McCain’s proposal to drill for more energy.

On July 26, McCain put out a web ad that absolutely eviscerated the press for being in bed with Obama. Almost three minutes long, there is not a single mention of John McCain. “Do you feel that thrill running up your leg yet?” the advertisement concludes.

Also on July 26, the McCain campaign reworked the Troops ad that they ran eight days ago, only this time they put in the false accusation that Obama wouldn’t go see wounded soldiers because “the pentagon wouldn’t allow him to bring cameras.” The last ten seconds included footage of McCain, but offered no specifics only policy, simply “John McCain is always there for our troops.”

On July 30 comes the real kicker, the now-infamous “Celeb” ad, which McCain has said he is “proud” of. The spot, thirty-seconds in length, is literally all about Obama, with McCain only coming in to say he endorsed the message. Indeed, Paris Hilton and Britney Spears — to whom Obama is compared — get as much face time.

On August 1, the McCain campaign is fully focused on Obama. This time, they put together a minute long spot that is devoted entirely to Obama’s Berlin speech and ask why the Illinois Democrat never mentioned a Latin American country in his address. Designed to appeal to Hispanic voters, McCain’s name only comes up when he endorses the message.

Later in the day, McCain put out a web ad titled “The One” that, again, is all about Obama. It goes for a minute-and-a-quarter and mocks Obama as an egotistical maniac along the lines of Moses (played by Charlton Heston).

And of course there was this add put out by the RNC on John McCains behalf comparing Obama to David Hasselhoff:

Updated: McCain’s 70 Flip Flops And Counting…

Posted in Flip Flops, Read for Yourself with tags , on July 28, 2008 by doubletalkexpress

This is an updated list of John McCain’s complete 180 degree turn abouts on positions. As Steve Benen from The Carpetbagger Report points out, John McCain has had a long career in the Senate and changes of positions over time is totally acceptable. However, it wasn’t until he started to run for president that he began to really flip on these positions. There is a difference between gradually changing your mind overtime and blatant political pandering.

Here is the list:

National Security Policy

1. McCain thought Bush’s warrantless-wiretap program circumvented the law; now he believes the opposite.

2. McCain insisted that everyone, even “terrible killers,” “the worst kind of scum of humanity,” and detainees at Guantanamo Bay, “deserve to have some adjudication of their cases,” even if that means “releasing some of them.” McCain now believes the opposite.

3. He opposed indefinite detention of terrorist suspects. When the Supreme Court reached the same conclusion, he called it “one of the worst decisions in the history of this country.”

4. In February 2008, McCain reversed course on prohibiting waterboarding.

5. McCain was for closing the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay before he was against it.

6. When Barack Obama talked about going after terrorists in Pakistani mountains with predators, McCain criticized him for it. He’s since come to the opposite conclusion.

Foreign Policy

7. McCain was for kicking Russia out of the G8 before he was against it.

8. McCain supported moving “towards normalization of relations” with Cuba. Now he believes the opposite.

9. McCain believed the U.S. should engage in diplomacy with Hamas. Now he believes the opposite.

10. McCain believed the U.S. should engage in diplomacy with Syria. Now he believes the opposite.

11. McCain is both for and against a “rogue state rollback” as a focus of his foreign policy vision.

12. McCain used to champion the Law of the Sea convention, even volunteering to testify on the treaty’s behalf before a Senate committee. Now he opposes it.

13. McCain was against divestment from South Africa before he was for it.

Military Policy

14. McCain recently claimed that he was the “greatest critic” of Rumsfeld’s failed Iraq policy. In December 2003, McCain praised the same strategy as “a mission accomplished.” In March 2004, he said, “I’m confident we’re on the right course.” In December 2005, he said, “Overall, I think a year from now, we will have made a fair amount of progress if we stay the course.”

15. McCain has changed his mind about a long-term U.S. military presence in Iraq on multiple occasions, concluding, on multiple occasions, that a Korea-like presence is both a good and a bad idea.

16. McCain was against additional U.S. forces in Afghanistan before he was for it.

17. McCain said before the war in Iraq, “We will win this conflict. We will win it easily.” Four years later, McCain said he knew all along that the war in Iraq war was “probably going to be long and hard and tough.”

18. McCain has repeatedly said it’s a dangerous mistake to tell the “enemy” when U.S. troops would be out of Iraq. In May, McCain announced that most American troops would be home from Iraq by 2013.

19. McCain was against expanding the GI Bill before he was for it.

20. McCain staunchly opposed Obama’s Iraq withdrawal timetable, and even blasted Mitt Romney for having referenced the word during the GOP primaries. In July, after Iraqi officials endorsed Obama’s policy, McCain said a 16-month calendar sounds like “a pretty good timetable.”

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